GO Carbon Steel Buttweld Concentric Reducer Range Schedule 40 ASTM A234 WPB ANSI B16.9

SKU: WCR2015

$6

GO Carbon Steel Buttweld Concentric Reducer Range Schedule 40 ASTM A234 WPB ANSI B16.9

GO Industrial offers a range of Carbon Buttweld fittings in 90º and 45º Elbows, Concentric and Eccentric Reducers, End Caps, Stainless Steel Equal and Reducing Tees, Flanges, Stub Ends and Weld On Collars.

The concentric reducer is cone-shaped, and is used when there is a shift in diameter between pipes. For example, when a 1" pipe transitions into a 3/4" pipe and the top or bottom of the pipe doesn't need to remain level. ... Unlike eccentric reducers, concentric reducers have a common center line.

What is a Buttweld Fitting?

  • A buttweld pipe fitting is designed to be welded on site at its end(s) to connect pipe(s) together and allow change in direction or pipe diameter, or branching or ending.
  • This fitting then becomes part of a system for transporting fluids (oil, gas, steam, chemicals, …) in a safe and efficient manner, over short or long distances.
  • Other types of fittings can be threaded or socket welded.

What are the advantages of Buttwelding over Flanges?

  • Flanges connect pipes by bolting them together, whereas butt weld fittings connect pipes by welding them together.
  • Depending on size, butt weld fittings require 10% to 75% less material than a flanged connection, which means lower material cost and lower weight.
  • Welded construction permits greater freedom in designing a layout; this system uses less space, is more compact, and has greater strength.
  • Butt weld fittings provide optimum flow characteristics, without pockets or sharp corners, creating less frictional resistance, no pressure loss, less turbulence, …

How are Pipe Fittings Measured?

  • Pipe fittings are measured by their diameter, wall thickness (known as “schedule”), and shape or configuration. (Fittings are also defined by their material grade and whether they are welded or seamless.)
  • Diameter refers to outside diameter of a pipe or fitting.
  • The North American standard is known as Nominal Pipe Size (NPS). The International Standard is known as Diameter Nominal (DN). Pipes and fittings are actually made in similar sizes around the world: they are just labeled differently.
  • From ½ in to 12 inch “Nominal Pipe Size”, outside diameters are slightly larger than indicated size; inside diameters get smaller as schedules grow.
  • From 14 in and larger “Nominal Pipe Size”, outside diameters are exactly as indicated size; inside diameters get smaller as schedules grow.
  • As with other North American standards (inch, foot, yard, mile, …), many pipe standards (diameters up to 12 inch and wall thickness) are based on historical precedents (a toolmaker’s dies during US Civil War) rather than a “scientific” method.

What does Schedule Mean for Pipe Fittings?

  • Schedule, often shortened as sch, is a North American standard that refers to wall thickness of a pipe or pipe fitting. Higher schedules mean thicker walls that can resist higher pressures.
  • Pipe standards define these wall thicknesses: SCH 5, 5S, 10, 10S, 20, 30, 40, 40S, 60, 80, 80S, 100, 120, 140, 160, STD, XS and XXS. (S following a number is for stainless steel. Sizes without an S are for carbon steel.)
  • Higher schedules are heavier, require more material and are therefore more costly to make and install.

 

 

 

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